Brand: Bantam

Product Code: 9780553276770

Availability:Out of stock

$5.99 5.99
Biographical Note:
Our foremost storyteller of the American West, Louis L'Amour has thrilled a nation by chronicling the adventures of the brave men and woman who settled the frontier. There are more than three hundred million copies of his books in print around the world.


Jacket Description/Flap:
The Lonely Men
Tell Sackett had been lured into the Apache's mountain stronghold by the icy beauty of his brother's wife. He didn't go alone. John J. Battles, Spanish Murphy and the half-breed Tampico rode beside him. Each was driven by his past to test his speed and cunning against an enemy who could smell a white man a mile away-and then shoot his eyes out at a dead gallop. It was a contest few men could enter-and fewer still could hope to win.


The Sacketts
They are the unforgettable pioneer family created by master storyteller Louis L'Amour to bring to vivid life the spirit and adventure of the American frontier. The Sacketts, men and women who challenged the untamed wilderness with their dreams and their courage. From generation to generation they pushed ever westward with a restless, wandering urge, a kinship with the free, wild places and a fierce independence.
The Sacketts always stood tall and, true to their strong family pride, they would unite to take on any and all challenges, no matter how overwhelming the odds. Each Sackett novel is a complete, exciting history adventure, and read a s a group, Louis L'Amour's The Sacketts form an epic story of the building of our mighty nation, a saga cherished by millions of readers around the world for more than a quarter century.



Marc Notes:
Originally published: 1969.;Tell Sackett had developed respect for Apaches as warriors, but that respect is lost when Apache braves kidnap his nephew, forcing him to cross into the Sierra Madres to bring the boy back. But could this be a trap set by his sister-in-law to deliver him into an Apache ambush?.


Publisher Marketing:
Tell Sackett had been lured into the Apache's mountain stronghold by the icy beauty of his brother's wife. He didn't go alone. John J. Battles, Spanish Murphy and the half-breed Tampico rode beside him. Each was driven by his past to test his speed and cunning against an enemy who could smell a white man a mile away--and then shoot his eyes out at a dead gallop. It was a contest few men could enter--and fewer still could hope to win.